Weekend resources

From November 19, 2017, Building Bridges Across the Racial Divide

Some additional resources to help us build bridges:

Video

Thirteenth (feature length documentary on slavery after the Emancipation Proclamation)

Pimping Within Political Parties, Carl Ellis

The Rise of Ghetto Nihilism, Carl Ellis

How You See Your Neighbor, Daniel D Lee, Fuller

Audio

Unity Begins with Relationship, LaTasha Morrison, founder of “Be The Bridge,” on podcast, “The Calling, 8/23/17

Lacrae discusses leaving evangelicalism, Truth’s Table podcast

Print articles

Facing Our Legacy of Lynching, D.L. Mayfield, Christianity Today Cover Story, September 2017

Open Letter to John Piper on White Evangelicalism and Multiethnic Relations, Ray Chang, The Exchange Blog, October 2017

A Beautiful Tapestry (Jennifer’s story), Jennifer Guerra

Feeling the Pain Despite the Facts, Bryan Loritts

The Lie, Lisa Sharon Harper

Working Together Toward Racial Reconciliation, William E Pannell & Joy J Moore

How Christians Combat Racism Theologically After Charlottesville, Clifton Clarke & Jarvis J Williams

We Don’t All Look Alike, Carl Ellis

To All My White Christian Friends Regarding Recent Events, Latrice Ingram

Books

The Myth of Equality, Ken Wytsma

The New Jim Cow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness, Michelle Alexander

Between the World and Me, Ta-Nehisi Coates

The Next Evangelicalism: Freeing the Church from Western Cultural Captivity, Soong-Chan Rah

Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption, Bryan Stevenson

A Fellowship of Differents, Scot McKnight

 

From November 5, 2017, Refugee Sunday

We are partnering with World Vision for this event to bring relief to the plight of some of the 65 million displaced people in our world.

If you want to give financially thru Seneca Creek, just visit our giving page here and choose the “World Vision” category. Please note that we will conclude this giving option by November 7th.

If you want more info on World Vision and their efforts, visit them here.

If you’re interested in the refugee resettlement efforts in our area, you can get more info here, here, and here.

And if you’d like to continue to pray for God’s intervention, here are the specific ways we suggested on November 5th:

  • For war, conflict, and other crises to end
  • For the 25 million in East Africa who need immediate food and humanitarian aid
  • That refugees and displaced people will be able to return to their home communities to rebuild in peace and safety
  • For comfort for families who are grieving the loss of loved ones
  • For protection, health, and brighter futures for children growing up in the midst of conflict

From September 24, 2017

The stages of faith from Brian McLaren’s book, Finding Faith, are as follows:

  Simplicity Complexity Perplexity Humility
Focus is on… Right or wrong Effective or ineffective Honest or dishonest Wise or unwise
Motive Please the authorities, be an insider Reach goals & be effective Be honest & authentic Serve, contribute, make difference
Beliefs There are easy answers, and the right authority has them Anything is possible…just find the best methods, beliefs, etc. Nothing is certain. Everything is relative There are a few basic truths, much relative, and mystery
Perceptions Dualistic Pragmatic Relativistic Integrated
Motto You’re for us or against us Find whatever works for you Who knows who is right Moravians’ quote
Authorities Godlike – they help you know Coaches – help you grow Dishonest and controlling People like the rest of us – some good, some not
Like/

Dislike

Bold confident answers/ tentative “I don’t knows” Clear instructions and motivating to action/ dogmatic or mystical (1&3) Questioners and free-spirits/ people in phase 1 & 2 People who combine thoughtfulness with accomplishment
Strategy Learn the answers and avoid the enemy Learn the technique and give people what they want Ask hard questions. Be ruthlessly honest Learn all the answers & techniques you can, ask all the ?’s you can, and try to fulfill your potential with humility
Strengths Highly committed and willing to sacrifice Enthusiasm, idealism, action Depth, honesty, humor or sensitivity Earlier stages, plus stability, endurance, humility, and wisdom
Weaknesses Simplistic, arrogant, judgmental, intolerant Superficial, naïve Cynical, withdrawn, elitist Those of earlier stages
Identity In leader or group In a cause or achievement In solitude, or with other alienated friends In relationship to the whole, or to God
God is… Ultimate Authority figure and/or Friend Ultimate Guide or Coach Mythical, outgrown authority, opiate of masses, or mystery I’m seeking Knowable yet mysterious, just yet merciful, (sustaining tensions)
Transition key Experience fallen leaders or diverse views, and shift for desire for certain knowledge to desire for accomplishments and success Stage 1 people and their quest for truth.  Stage 2 strategies that don’t always work.  A desire to integrate the fragmented complexities of life Struggle between arrogance (toward 1&2) and humility.  Life demands values, beliefs, etc.  What CAN one hold onto? Repeat the process in new arenas…?

From July 23, 2017

For a more detailed and focused conversation on the topic of sexuality from a biblical perspective, check out this message from 2015.

And here’s another message from 3 part series on sexuality in 2009 titled, “Single Sex.”

 

From June 2017

Our annual food drive takes place during June. You’re invited to bring any of the following items and leave them in the lobby on Sundays in June:

FRUITS AND VEGETABLES

Choose canned fruits and vegetable in an array of colors to provide a variety of vitamins and minerals. Low sodium canned vegetables, canned tomato products with no added salt/sugar, canned fruit in juice, dried fruit no sugar added.

PROTEIN

Choose canned lean meats as a good source of protein and canned or dried beans for added fiber. Canned tuna/salmon in water, canned chicken, canned chili, canned beans, dried beans, nut butters, dry-roasted or raw nuts and seeds.

GRAINS

100% whole grains and grain products offer a complete package of nutrients. Brown rice, quinoa, buckwheat and other whole grains, whole wheat pasta, rolled oats and plain instant oatmeal, low sugar high fiber cereal.

ADDITIONAL HEALTHFUL ITEMS

Boxed UHT or evaporated milk, vegetable oils, tea and coffee, vegetarian items, infant cereals, baby food.

 

From April 2, 2017

From the message, “Significance In Sharing,” the following resources could be used in the third habit of living “questionable” lives, by Learning Christ.  (These resources are copied from Michael Frost’s, Surprise the World.)

Philip Yancey. The Jesus I Never Knew. Yancey uncovers a Jesus who is brilliant, creative, challenging, fearless, compassionate, unpredictable, and ultimately satisfying.

N. T. Wright. The Challenge of Jesus. A highly stimulating treatment of the hard, historical work needed to understand Jesus within the Palestinian world of the first century, as well as a passionate call to follow Jesus more faithfully into our world today.

J. John. The Life: A Portrait of Jesus. An excellent introduction to the living, breathing human
being at the center of the Christian good news: Jesus of Nazareth. Easy to read, with helpful answers to some of the common questions we all have about Jesus’ life.

Dave Roberts. Following Jesus: A NonReligious Guidebook for the Spiritually Hungry. This book will revolutionize your walk with God, revealing a perspective on Jesus you’ve never seen before. Explores what a real, dynamic relationship with Jesus looks like. Excellent, particularly if your faith
life is getting a little stale.

John Dickson. A Spectator’s Guide to Jesus. The back cover sums it up: “If you have ever wondered how a crucified Palestinian peasant could end up winning the allegiance of 2 billion confessed Christians today, this book will provide some of the answers.” Really useful historical teaching to correct some of the rubbish out there!

Don Everts. God in the Flesh.  Looks at Jesus via the reactions of those who met him. The real
Jesus jumps off the page and comes to life as a compelling person and very, very cool. Short studies included.

Conrad Gempf. Mealtime Habits of the Messiah.  A funny, quirky, and informative book that looks at forty of Jesus’ encounters with others, with questions for reflection. Jesus: alive, fun, engaging, warm, and occasionally dangerous.

Mike Erre. The Jesus of Suburbia: Have We Tamed the Son of God to Fit Our Lifestyle?  Mike Erre paints an exciting, inspiring, and powerful picture of the real Jesus. He challenges us to embrace the message of Jesus Christ as a revolutionary, life transforming, culture-impacting movement of God. Brilliant!

Tom Taylor. Paradoxy: Coming to Grips with the Contradictions of Jesus.  This book unfolds
some of the core mysteries of Jesus’ upsidedown teachings (for example, die to live, serve to reign, and walk by faith not by sight). More than any other book, Paradoxy helped me understand the lifestyle Jesus wants his followers to live. Really explains why doing life Jesus’ way is better than any other.

Kenneth Bailey. Jesus Through Middle Eastern Eyes. At over four hundred pages, this very
weighty exploration puts Jesus in his sociopolitical and religiocultural context. Challenging, but essential reading for those wanting to understand Jesus.

From January 8, 2017

From the message, “Shaping Your Interior Life,” here is the complete list of spiritual practices as they relate to areas of growth (from Ruth Haley Barton’s book, Sacred Rhythms).

Sins and Negative Patterns Corresponding Disciplines (a.k.a. Practices)
Gossip/sins of speech Silence, self-examination
Anxiety and worry Breath prayer, Scripture reflection
Envy and competitiveness Solitude, self-examination
Discontent Attending to desire
Self-reliance Silence, prayer, community
Avoidance patterns Community, spiritual friendship
Over-busyness Solitude, discernment, Sabbath, rule of life
Anger and bitterness Silence, self-examination, confession
Feelings of inadequacy Examen of consciousness, self-knowledge and celebration
Guilt, shame Solitude, confession, forgiveness
Lust Attending to desire in God’s presence
Restlessness and stress Solitude, silence, breath prayer
Lethargy and/or laziness Caring for the body, exercise
Lack of faith Prayer, Scripture
Feelings of isolation Examen of consciousness, community
Selfishness and self-centeredness Prayer and worship in community
Lack of direction Discernment, listening to the body

For suggestions on getting started on a Bible reading plan that will work for you, check out this helpful article.

The concept of spiritual pathways is found in Gary Thomas’s, “Sacred Pathways.”  A more abbreviated treatment is found in chapter 7 of John Ortberg’s, “God Is Closer Than You Think.”

The seven pathways we touched on this weekend are:

  • Intellectual,
  • Relational,
  • Serving,
  • Worship,
  • Activist,
  • Contemplative, and
  • Creation

We gave these a more thorough treatment several years ago in October 2012, in a message called, “Just Like Jesus: Finding a Shortcut.”

 

From October 9, 2016 (Vote for Jesus the President)

The following is taken from Scot McKnight’s book, Kingdom Conspiracy.  It’s an overview of God’ plan as it’s played out in history and recorded in the Bible.

Plan A

  • God alone is King
  • Humans are to rule under God
  • Humans usurp God’s role (Gen 3, sin, etc.)
  • God forgives them and forms a covenant (w/ Abraham and his descendants)

Plan B

  • God alone is still King
  • Israel is to rule God’s world under God
  • Israel wants to usurp God’s rule
  • God accommodates Israel by granting it a human king. (while warning them what it would cost…taxes, conscription, loss of property and servants, etc.)
  • The story of the Old Testament becomes the story of David
  • God continues to forgive Israel of its sins through the temple system of sacrifice, purity and forgiveness

Plan A revised

  • God alone is King
  • God is now ruling in King Jesus
  • Israel and the church live under the rule of King Jesus
  • Forgiveness is granted through King Jesus, the Savior
  • This rule of Jesus will be complete in the final kingdom.

From May 15, 2016 (Is God Really Exclusive?)

The following graphic is from Dan Kimball’s, “They Like Jesus But Not the Church,” p. 173

Faith timelines

 

From April 24, 2016 (Did God Really Create the World?)

For further videos and other resources on this topic , click here.

For a great TED talk on the relationship between faith and evolution, click here.

For some excellent reading on this, check out, “The Lost World of Genesis One,” by John Walton.

If you’re not into reading, much of his thinking is in this extended video.

And the graphics we used on Sunday are included here:

two books

From April 10, 2016

For further reading on the evidence for a reliable Bible, see

  • A chart detailing the historical, documentary evidence for the Bible, see this web page.
  • An excellent but brief treatment of the reliability of the Bible in Tim Keller’s, “The Reason For God,” chapter 7.
  • A more thorough exploration of  this topic in Craig Blomberg’s, “Can We Still Believe the Bible.”

From February 28, 2016

For the stages of emotional maturity, see below in the entry for February 2015.

The four strategies mentioned to help us grow in emotional maturity are:

Use a “bill of rights,” agreeing that you and others have the right to:

  • Space and privacy
  • Be different
  • Disagree
  • Be heard
  • Be taken seriously
  • Be given the benefit of the doubt
  • Be told the truth
  • Be consulted
  • Be imperfect and make mistakes
  • Courteous and honorable treatment
  • Be respected

Fact-check your assumptions

  • Reflect on something you suspect the other person thinks or feels but hasn’t told you. (E.g. they’re angry with me, disappointed, etc.)
  • Ask, “Do I have your permission to check out an assumption I am making?”
  • Say, “I think you think…” or “I assume you are thinking…” When you finish, ask them, “Is this correct?”
  • Give the other person an opportunity to respond.

Clarify expectations, ensuring they are:

  • Conscious
  • Realistic
  • Spoken
  • Agreed upon

Diagnose your emotional allergies

 

From June 13-14, 2015

Here’s the video we showed:

And here’s part 2 of that same video:

From February 14-15, 2015

From Pete Scazzero’s book, “Emotionally Healthy Spirituality,” the following lists were mentioned:

Top ten symptoms of emotionally unhealthy spirituality

  • Using God to run from God
  • Ignoring the emotions of anger, sadness and fear
  • Dying to the wrong things
  • Denying the past’s impact on the present
  • Dividing our lives into “secular” and “sacred” compartments
  • Doing for God instead of being with God
  • Spiritualizing away conflict
  • Covering over brokenness, weakness, and failure
  • Living without limits
  • Judging other people’s spiritual journey

Four stages of emotional maturity/development

1. Emotional Infants

  • Look for others to take care of them
  • Have great difficulty entering into the world of others
  • Are driven by need for instant gratification
  • Use others as objects to meet their needs

2. Emotional Children

  • Are content and happy as long as they receive what they want
  • Unravel quickly from stress, disappointments, trials
  • Interpret disagreements as personal offenses
  • Are easily hurt
  • Complain, withdraw, manipulate, take revenge, become sarcastic when they don’t get their way
  • Have great difficulty calmly discussing their needs and wants in a mature, loving way

3. Emotional Adolescents

  • Tend to often be defensive
  • Are threatened and alarmed by criticism
  • Keep score of what they give so they can ask for something later in return
  • Deal with conflict poorly, often blaming appeasing, going to a third party, pouting, or ignoring the issue entirely
  • Become preoccupied with themselves
  • Have great difficulty truly listening to another person’s pain, disappointments or needs
  • Are critical and judgmental

4. Emotional Adults

  • Are able to ask for what they need, want, or prefer—clearly, directly, honestly
  • Recognize, manage, and take responsibility for their own thoughts and feelings
  • Can, when under stress, state their own beliefs and values without becoming adversarial
  • Respect others without having to change them
  • Give people room to make mistakes and not be perfect
  • Appreciate people for who they are—the good, bad, and ugly—not for what they give back
  • Accurately assess their own limits, strengths and weaknesses and are able to freely discuss them with others
  • Are deeply in tune with their own emotional world and able to enter into the feelings, needs, and concerns of others without losing themselves.
  • Have the capacity to resolve conflict maturely and negotiate solutions that consider the perspectives of others.

From February 7-8, 2015

Resource list for blog:

The Ring Makes All the Difference: The Hidden Consequences of Cohabitation and the Strong Benefits of Marriage, Glenn T. Stanton

The New Rules For Love, Sex and Dating, Andy Stanley

The Thrill of the Chaste: Finding Fulfillment While Keeping Your Clothes On, Dawn Eden

Sacred Marriage: What If God Designed Marriage To Make Us Holy More Than To Make Us Happy?, Gary Thomas

Five Lies Single Christians Believe About Sex

Talking with Millennials About Sex (video)

Effects of Pornography

From January 3-4, 2015

Additional info can be found in Gary Thomas’ excellent book, “Every Body Matters.”

For more info about the upcoming Daniel Plan simulcast on January 10th at Noon, please visit our event page here.

From men’s breakfast on November 8th:

Check out this video…

From November 1-2, 2014

The weekend message detailing the purposes and importance of baptism can be found HERE.

From September 13/14, 2014

The video can be viewed on our Unleash site, or right here:

From September 6/7, 2014

The concept of spiritual pathways is explained in detail in Gary Thomas’, “Sacred Pathways.”  A more abbreviated treatment is found in chapter 7 of John Ortberg’s, “God Is Closer Than You Think.”

The seven pathways we touched on this weekend are:

  • Intellectual,
  • Relational,
  • Serving,
  • Worship,
  • Activist,
  • Contemplative, and
  • Creation

We gave these a more thorough treatment two years ago in October 2012, in a message called, “Just Like Jesus: Finding a Shortcut.”

From June 7/8, 2014

We discussed “Faith and Sexuality.” You can listen to the message here.

The video is from a web site called livingout.org.  You’ll find other encouraging stories of people dealing with same-sex attractions at that site.

A good book written by a young Christian who struggles with same sex attraction is Washed and Waiting, by Wesley Hill

An excellent discussion on elevating the conversation between Christians and the LGBT community is Andrew Marin’s Love Is An Orientation

And if you want a deeply scholarly look at the biblical passages, context, and culture, consider Robert Gagnon’s The Bible and Homosexual Practice.  It’s not a light read, but it’s incredibly thorough and fair.

Finally, if you are parent whose child is dealing with same sex attraction, consider the resources at leadthemhome.org

From May 24/25, 2014

The video we opened with is found on the web site of BioLogos.  You will other resources on their site as well.

For details on the fine-tuning of the universe in a way that exhibits the fingerprints of God, see Why the Universe Is the Way It Is, by Hugh Ross

For details on the context of the nation of Israel to whom Genesis 1 was written, see The Galileo Connection, by Charles Hummel

For the article by Francis Collins, mentioned by Dr. Ray Cho in the interview, click here: ASA2002Collins  A transcript is available here. Human Genome

You can find the American Scientific Affiliation here.

Additional print resources include:

Coming to Peace with Science, Darrel Falk

Real Scientists, Real Faith, R.J.Berry, ed.

Finding Darwin’s God, Kenneth Miller

 Finally, if you’re a scientist with a story of how you’ve integrated your faith, and would like to share it, please check out Leigh Greathouse’ website and project here.

From April 26/27, 2014

The chart in this week’s insert can be found at this web page.

An excellent but brief treatment of the reliability of the Bible is in Tim Keller’s, “The Reason For God,” chapter 7, “You Can’t Take the Bible Literally.”

A more thorough exploration of  this topic is Craig Blomberg’s, “Can We Still Believe the Bible.”

The account of Anne Rice’s journey back to Christian faith is available here.

From February 1/2, 2014

Suggested Scripture songs to listen to and memorize

  • Today Is the Day
  • Never Let Go
  • Blessed Be Your Name
  • You Are Good
  • Revelation  Song
  • Love the Lord Your God
  • Those Who Trust
  • Your Love Oh Lord
  • Our God Saves
  • You Are Holy (Prince of Peace)
  • Your Name
  • I Am Not Forgotten
  • I Have a Hope
  • 10,000 Reasons

Suggested verses to memorize (listed in order they appear in the Bible).  See biblegateway.com for specifics

  • Genesis 1:27
  • Psalm 139:13-14
  • Joshua 24:15
  • Job 1:21
  • Psalm 8
  • Psalm 19
  • Psalm 119:105
  • Isaiah 53:4-6
  • Isaiah 58:6-8
  • Matthew 5:16
  • Matthew 6:19-21
  • Matthew 6:33
  • Matthew 28:19-20
  • Mark 10:43-45
  • John 10:10
  • Acts 1:8
  • Romans 8:28
  • Romans 12:1-2
  • 2 Corinthians 5:17
  • Ephesians 2:10

Try an online reading plan like one of these from YouVersion (available on your smart phone or computer):

21 Days in Matthew

Gospel of John (in 3 weeks)

Experiencing God’s Renewal (5 days)

Deeper into Romans (one month)

The entire New Testament in five minutes a day

The New Testament and Psalms (in 51 weeks)

The entire Bible in chronological sequence (10 minutes a day for a year)

Or try reading selected books from the Bible:

Level 1: (Have never tried to read, don’t know much at ALL about the Bible)

Start with John, then James, then Genesis, then Romans, then Esther, then Proverbs

Level 2: (Have read some, and listened to more sermons than I can remember.  I know the Old Testament from the New, and don’t feel like a rookie.)

Read Luke, then Acts, then Exodus, then Ephesians, then 1 Samuel, then 1 Corinthians, then Psalms, then 1 John, then Jonah, then 1 Peter, then 1 Kings, then Colossians

Level 3: (Have read a fair amount, and need to tackle something deeper.  Ready for a challenge this year.)

Read Isaiah, then Matthew, then Deuteronomy, then Hebrews, then Job, then Philippians, then Daniel, then Revelation, then Judges, then 2 Corinthians, then Joshua , then 1 Timothy, then Hosea, then Galatians, then 2 Samuel, then Mark, then 1 Kings, then Nehemiah

How long would it take you to read the entire Bible? That depends on your reading speed. Check your reading speed and calculate time here.

From January 25/26, 2014

For a 35 day Bible reading plan to encourage you in your pursuit of upgrading your appetites, check out this “soul detox” plan.

For a more detailed description of how to engage in fasting from food, see Richard Foster’s A Celebration of Discipline, chapter 4.

For help on how to eat using a SNAP diet/budget, see this USDA web site.

From November 2/3, 2013

The recordings of our earlier messages on the topic of relationships between men and women and the New Testament’s comments about man being the “head” of woman can be found here, under the titles, “Becoming Part of a Healthy Church, Parts 1 & 2″

Or you can find them by visiting iTunes and scrolling through the list of podcasts.

Here are several options for making decisions in a marriage without having one person be the “final decision maker.”

(adapted from Gilbert Bilezikian’s, Beyond Sex Roles)

1. Defer to each other.  This creates opportunities for the other person to have his or her way.

2. Exercise spiritual gifts.  Determine whose spiritual gifts are most applicable to the decision being made.

3. Compromise.  You may need to get help in conflict resolution skills.

4. Using biblical principles involved, make a pros and cons list and use that to make the decision.

5. Pray together for guidance.  Wait and listen for God’s direction.

6. Allow God to provide guidance through circumstances.

7. Give preference to the person who will be more affected by the decision.

8. Do a joint research project on the issue.

9. Seek out a trusted third party whose advice you agree in advance to follow.

10. Try to articulate the other person’s point of view, arguing it as convincingly as you can.

From April 13/14, 2013

(Message: A Career That Counts)

The enormously helpful book on the topic of faith and work is Tim Keller’s, “Every Good Endeavor.”  I can’t recommend it enough.  And it would be a dream to see discussion groups form around this book based on the different areas of work represented here at Seneca Creek (e.g. sciences, education, IT, etc.)

From March 30, 2013 (Easter)

Additional resources on the authenticity of the resurrection:

See the following links:

Historical Evidence for the Resurrection, Matt Perman

Historical Evidence for the Resurrection, Christopher Lang (same title, much more academic treatment)

(video) Is There a Case for the Resurrection of Jesus Christ, William Craig Lane

(book) The Case for Easter: A Journalist Investigates the Evidence for the Resurrection, Lee Stobel

(book) The Case for the Resurrection: A First Century Investigative Reporter Probes History’s Pivotal Event, Lee Strobel

From December 9th

Here’s the video that was shown on Sunday to describe the gospel in a concise format:

 

From December 2nd

Print resources:

The Reason for God, Tim Keller

Mere Christianity, C.S.Lewis

Where Is God When It Hurts, Philip Yancey

To Everyone an Answer, William Lane Craig and J.P. Moreland

Simply Christian, N.T.Wright

The Case for Christ, Lee Strobel

Jesus Among Other Gods, Ravi Zacharias

Know Why You Believe, Paul Little

The Problem of Pain, C.S.Lewis

They Like Jesus But Not the Church, Dan Kimball

Origins: Christian Perspectives on Creation, Evolution, and Intelligent Design, Deborah Haarsma and Loren Haarsma

The Language of God: A Scientist Presents Evidence for Belief, Francis Collins

Web resources:

www.reasonablefaith.org (William Craig Lane’s ministry)

www.probe.org (Probe ministries)

www.rzim.org (Ravi Zacharias ministries)

From October 21st

Today’s concept of spiritual pathways is explained in detail in Gary Thomas’, “Sacred Pathways.”  A more abreviated treatment is found in chapter 7 of John Ortberg’s, “God Is Closer Than You Think.”

The seven pathways we touched on this morning are:

Intellectual, Relational, Serving, Worship, Activist, Contemplative, and Creation

And from the Family Meeting, if you want to check out the One Percent Solution, here’s the link to the podcast.

From October 14th

I learned of the distinction between trying and training from two sources.  Dallas Willard’s, “The Spirit of the Disciplines,” and John Ortberg’s, “The Life You’ve Always Wanted.”  This topic is discussed in numerous other works, but is summarized well in either of the two mentioned.  Ortberg’s treatment is more conversational, and Willard’s more intellectual.

Click here for a downloadable copy of the Training Tools that were handed out Sunday morning.

Some of the concepts discussed this morning are discussed in greater detail on Dallas Willard’s blog site.  Spiritual disciplines,and living a transformed life are just two of the many helpful (though challenging) articles.

BONUS: If you wonder what the pictures were that were referenced in the message, here’s the before:

And here’s the after.  🙂

From September 23rd

The KidServe project can be found on Facebook, at this link: http://www.facebook.com/pages/KidServe/303722629685066

From June 17th

The podcast I referred to, in which we explored the reliability of the accounts of Jesus death and resurrection is located here.

For an objective overview of the different religions of the world, see www.religionsfacts.com

From May 5th

The podcasts in which Jeannette and I taught through the concept of “headship” in Ephesians 5 can be found on the Seneca Creek website, or by visiting iTunes and scrolling through the list of podcasts.

I referred to J. Lee Grady’s book, 10 Lies Men Believe.

I also quoted from Gary Thomas’s, Sacred Marriage

For those who want to understand their husbands, I recommended Dr. Kevin Leman’s, 7 Things He’ll Never Tell You…But You Need to Know.

And for married couples interested in developing a better, more healthy physical/sexual relationship, I recommend another book by Dr. Kevin Leman, Sheet Music: Uncovering the Secrets of Sexual Intimacy in Marriage.

From February 12th

I quoted from Gary Smalley’s, The DNA of Relationships.  He identifies the following core fears on p. 43:

You may fear feeling:

  1. Helpless, powerless, impotent, or controlled
  2. Rejected, as if people are closing me out of their lives
  3. Abandoned or left behind, as in divorce
  4. Disconnected from others or alone
  5. Like a failure
  6. Unloved, as if no one could love me
  7. Defective, as if something is wrong with me, as if I’m the problem
  8. Inadequate, as if I just don’t measure up to others like I should
  9. Pained both emotionally and physically
  10. Hypocritical or like a phony
  11. Inferior, as if I’m being placed below everyone else in value (belittled)
  12. Cheated or ripped off or taken advantage of
  13. Invalidated, as if my words and actions are being ignored or devalued
  14. Unfulfilled, as if what is happening to me will lead to a dissatisfied life
  15. Humiliated, as if I have no dignity or self-respect
  16. Manipulated, as if others are deceiving me
  17. Isolated, as if others are planning to ignore me

From February 5th

The book I quoted from this morning is Emotionally Healthy Spirituality, by Pete Scazzero.

The descriptions from his book of the stages of Emotional Maturity are as follows:

Emotional Infancy

  • Look for others to take care of them
  • Have great difficulty entering into the world of others
  • Are driven by need for instant gratification
  • Use others as objects to meet their needs

Emotional Childhood

  • Are content and happy as long as they receive what they want
  • Unravel quickly from stress, disappointments, and trials
  • Interpret disagreements as personal offenses
  • Are easily hurt
  • Complain, withdraw, manipulate, take revenge, become sarcastic when they don’t get their way
  • Have great difficulty calmly discussing their needs and wants in a mature, loving way

Emotional Adolescence

  • Tend to often be defensive
  • Are threatened and alarmed by criticism
  • Keep score of what they give so they can ask for something later in return
  • Deal with conflict poorly, often blaming, appeasing, going to a third party, pouting, or ignoring the issue entirely
  • Become preoccupied with themselves
  • Have great difficulty truly listening to another person’s pain, disappointments, or needs

Emotional Adulthood

  • Are able to ask for what they need, want, or prefer—clearly, directly, honestly
  • Recognize, manage, and take responsibility for their own thoughts and feelings
  • Can, when under stress, state their own beliefs and values without becoming adversarial
  • Respect others without having to change them
  • Give people room to make mistakes and not be perfect
  • Appreciate people for who they are—the good, bad, and ugly—not for what they give back
  • Accurately assess their own limits, strengths, and weaknesses and are able to freely discuss them with others
  • Are deeply in tune with their own emotional world and able to enter into the feelings, needs, and concerns of others without losing themselves.
  • Have the capacity to resolve conflict maturely and negotiate solutions that consider the perspectives of others.

From January 29th

The tool we rolled out on January 29th is Monvee.  You can get details at their website.  Packets are available at Connection Point every Sunday.  The cost is $20 per packet.  For assistance in getting started see the short tutorial videos on our web site.

From January 15th:

The walking group meet up mentioned on January 15th is:

http://www.meetup.com/Seneca-Creek-Community-Church-Walking-Group

The book I mentioned on January 15th is:

Every Body Matters, by Gary Thomas.

The 19th century movement I referred to is “Muscular Christianity.”The Gospel

8 thoughts on “Weekend resources

  1. It would be really cool if there was a ‘print’ button to print off this blog but copy & paste works too! Thanks for posting the list…I wasn’t able to capture them all during service!

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